It’s All Our Fault

As David and Michael get to the halfway point in their adventure down the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers, it’s worth noting an interesting geological fact.

Morning on the Hooch. Headed to Lake Harding

Morning on the Hooch. Headed to Lake Harding. Photo by Michael Hanson

The Chattahoochee River is one of the oldest, most stable river channels in the United States.

The Brevard Fault channels the Chattahoochee River toward the southwest.

Our Fault: The Brevard Fault channels the Chattahoochee River toward the southwest.

See, For it’s first 100 miles or so, the Chattahoochee River runs along an ancient geological pileup known as the Brevard Fault Zone. It’s the same feature responsible for creating the Appalachian Mountains eons ago.

Instead of taking a meandering, lazy course to the Atlantic, the Hooch rigidly follows this fault line from Atlanta to the Southwest and then straight to the Gulf of Mexico, forming that Alabama-Georgia border.

A Lake Divided. On the left UGA flags and on the right, Bama. Lake Harding, GA/AL border. Photo by Michael Hanson

A Lake Divided. On the left UGA flags and on the right, Bama. Lake Harding, GA/AL border. Photo by Michael Hanson

The Hooch is locked in place, and can’t change it’s course much like other rivers do over time.

The fault line is perhaps one reason the Chattahoochee is so coveted by Georgia, Alabama and Florida. It’s a river you can depend on. And it’s all ours.

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